Category Archives: Exhibitions and events

Pele’s Empire

I have rediscovered Pele’s Empire (an artist duo) from a folder entitled reference images – a pile of unstructured visuals that I look at when faced with an impasse of some sort.

PE have an interesting way of integrating photographic material with sculpture in installation.

I think this is a hint for me in the way I incorporate flatbed photography into installation with video and sculpture.

 

 

Sarah Sze at Asia society

In both drawing and sculpture I’m interested in the depiction of gravity and weightlessness as both an operative and a disorienting force. I’m thinking about floating, sinking, rising, drifting, and the resulting fragility, disorientation, and instability.

 

This comment made by the New York-based artist Sarah Sze reveals much about her artistic intentions. She is interested in creating a physical and metaphysical experience through her complex yet lyrical assemblages of everyday materials. This exhibition presents her drawings, works on paper, and a series of new works that reflect not only her careful selection and placement of objects, but also her play between the boundaries of drawing and sculpture.

Checks and Balances (detail), 2011

The exhibition features a new series of installations where issues of perspective and choreography—of how the observer moves through space—are shown to great effect. One element of Sze’s work that is rarely acknowledged is her preoccupation with perspective, in particular, the views that appear distant and close within the same picture plane, frequently seen in Chinese traditional scroll paintings. She has described this as an interest in scale shifts that result from the absence of a middle ground, or the transitional space that bridges the foreground and background. Sze creates views through the use of line, light, and the arrangement of materials, which lead the eye across her work, much like the composition of a drawing.  Here, she has created a series of works that consider the line between two and three-dimensional space.  Using the vertical format of a hanging scroll as a starting point, the works extend from the wall and are drawn to the floor as they examine illusionary space, perspective, and the representation of landscape.

Also on view is a selection of works on paper and drawings from 1996 to the present. Sze’s drawings nearly always comprise alternate views and perspectives in the same picture planes using simple lines. We are sometimes unsure of the view, whether we are looking out into the distance or observing something microscopic. Other works include prints that incorporate planes of color to complement the line compositions and provide depth, while her more recent works, such as Checks and Balances, feature collage techniques and a greater focus on blurring the line between drawing and the sculptural object.

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social

21 July 2012 at 10.30–17.40 at Tate Modern – videos on line.

The ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation.

Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space.

Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers.

Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.

 

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social programme

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-1-0

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-2

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-3

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-4

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-5

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-6

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-8

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-9

 

Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation

Reed, KPHunt, ASheddan, SFitzpatrick, K(2012) Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation. Presented at: Inside/outside: materialising the social, Tate Modern.

AbstractThe ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation. Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space. Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers. Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.