Category Archives: Liminality

Ruins and liminality

Chapt 3. Ruins and Liminality

Ruin – Liminal Narratives

Nostalgia for Ruins

Advertisements

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social

21 July 2012 at 10.30–17.40 at Tate Modern – videos on line. programme and links follow

The ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation.

Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space.

Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers.

Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.

 

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social programme

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-1-0

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-2

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-3

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-4

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-5

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-6

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-8

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-9

 

Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation

Reed, KPHunt, ASheddan, SFitzpatrick, K(2012) Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation. Presented at: Inside/outside: materialising the social, Tate Modern.

AbstractThe ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation. Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space. Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers. Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.

Negative and positive – liminality

The negative image has been of interest for some time- for example  I have tried digitally blending abstract positive and negative video clips with a variety of blend modes.  Recently I stepped back and tried something simpler – combining positive and negative projections of slides with the aim of creating a grey image..

I was interested in the way in which bodies or objects shadowing the projections could then create positive or negative images of their own, but what turned out to be as intriguing was the effect of cancellation – which is imperfect.   This kind of faint grey image seeping through seems like a liminal image.  An image on the threshold of visibility.