Category Archives: Liminality

Ruins and liminality

Chapt 3. Ruins and Liminality

Ruin – Liminal Narratives

Nostalgia for Ruins

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Ragpickers and liminality

Following on from my interest in Mark Bradford I have started to read around the liminal figure of the ragpicker.

WASTE MATTER – THE DEBRIS OF INDUSTRIAL RUINS AND THE DISORDERING OF THE MATERIAL WORLD

Chapt 1 Rubbish- Histories, Values, aesthetics

Ragpickers and Leftover Performances

‘But how does the ragpicker make the historical leftover perform? The ragpicker is a liminal figure, literally living at the fringes of society: in Paris, they resided in shanty towns on the edge of town as part of the community of zoniers (‘zone’-dwellers or those living in the transition space between the city and countryside)’

performative leftovers

‘The ragpicker, first, stands for the undoing of established historiography and the institutions that support it. Aleida Assmann has pointed out that the rubbish dump and the archive, while seemingly each other’s opposite, are inextricably connected. The limit between  the archive and the rubbish dump marks the limit between what is and is not deemed of cultural value, and for that reason, archive and rubbish heap ‘can be read as emblems and symptoms of cultural memory and forgetting’ (Assmann 2006: 384, my translation). Refuse is what the archive refuses. For Assmann an archive of rubbish would make ‘the invisible as such, namely the basic structures of the cultural production of value and non-value, visible’ .’

the ragpicker’s diligent archiving of waste is not only a symbol for challenging existing master narratives in cultural memory, but also for the undoing of the conditions of possibility that enabled these master narratives. As Philip Rosen wrote: ‘the only way to recover the elements excluded from conventional historiography is to reject its form and terms’ (Rosen 2001: 15).

The Archivist of Urban Waste- Zoe Leonard, Photographer as Rag-Picker

Aleatory encounters- a rumination on trash and new materialist ontologies

The Madrid Ragpicker Pio Baroja

 

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social

21 July 2012 at 10.30–17.40 at Tate Modern – videos on line.

The ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation.

Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space.

Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers.

Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.

 

Inside:Outside- Materialising the Social programme

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-1-0

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-2

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-3

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-4

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-5

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-6

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-8

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/insideoutside-materialising-social-part-9

 

Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation

Reed, KPHunt, ASheddan, SFitzpatrick, K(2012) Liminal, 2012. Abigail Hunt, Kieren Reed, Katy Fitzpatrick and Susan Sheddan in conversation. Presented at: Inside/outside: materialising the social, Tate Modern.

AbstractThe ritual encounter with an artwork – be it in a museum, gallery, private or public space – has evolved dramatically over the last century: from the contemplation of an object, to immersive installation, performance or participation. Nicholas Bourriaud’s term ‘relational aesthetics’ referred specifically to work that took social relations as its basic medium. This kind of work usually took place within the walls of the designated art space, and operated in relation to the behavioural rules of that particular mindset (even if working against them). What, then, does it mean when an artist’s work intervenes in the social and political relationships that exist in the real world of everyday life? How can this be brought into the museum, how can it be displayed and how does it relate to the social rituals engendered by the architecture and rules of the specialist space. Inside/Outside: Materialising the Social will examine the ways in which these codes and boundaries have been tested in the work of a number of different artists in the past decades, and how they have been theorised by key thinkers and writers. Participants include Leo Asemota, Jelili Atiku, Claire Bishop, Katy Fitzpatrick, Abigail Hunt, Shannon Jackson, Suzanne Lacy, Lin Chi-Wei, Liu Ding, Mark Miller, Kieren Reed, Alex Schady, Susan Sheddan, Emma Smith and Dorothea von Hantelmann.